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Snoop Dogg certainly has a way with children.

On Snoop Dogg’s Father Hood, the 36-year-old rapper-turned-reality star can be seen rearing and playing with sons Corde, 13, Cordell, 10, and daughter Cori, 8, and wife Shante.

So as a father of three, what advice would he give Jennifer Lopez, who welcomed fraternal twins on February 22?

“One baby at a time,” he tells OK! at the Hip-Hop Summit Action Awards. “She’s going to have a good time with it. Babies are beautiful, especially having two at one time. I wish her luck, and how her babies remain to be safe and healthy and she enjoys her time with them.”

As for his own children, Snoop says he hopes to instill one important quality in them — drive.

“Ever since I was a youngster, I was a hustler,” Snoop, whose real name is Calvin Broadus, says. “I sold newspapers, candy, I was always out of the house trying to make money, so I commend any kid that tries to go get something in life, whether he’s trying to wash cars or pump gas or help ladies to their cars with their groceries. Any sort of hustle is what I push on a kid because it shows a sign that you want to be something in life.”

Although he’s rich and famous now, Snoop remembers growing up in Long Beach, Calif., and has great respect for kids doing what he used to to — selling candy. In fact, he always buys from them.

“I was one of those kids who sold that candy,” he says. “Instead of me buying one bar, I might give them $30 and say, ‘I don’t even want no candy’ because I understand what it takes to have that showmanship to be able to go door-to-door, hand-to-hand and say, ‘Hi ma’am, would you like to buy some candy from me?’ That takes a lot to humble yourself, to have that in you to ask somebody to buy something from you.”

What’s his best piece of advice for kids? Listen to your parents.

“They are teachers. These are people who have knowledge and wisdom and they’re trying to pass it on to you," Snoop says. "When they give you that, even if you don’t like it or understand it – take it in for what it’s worth because one day you’ll hear that voice again and you’ll be able to make a decision. You can say ‘I’m going to do the right thing or the wrong thing, but at least I know what’s right and what’s wrong.’”

By Valerie Nome

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