EXCLUSIVE

Alyssa Milano's 'Defiant Persona' Is Making 'Who's The Boss?' Executives Nervous

Alyssa Milano
Source: MEGA

Canceled already? A source reports that plans for a revival of '80s sitcom Who's the Boss? have gone cold after execs got anxious about the show's politically feisty star, Alyssa Milano

The actress, 47, broke out on the original series as the daughter of wisecracking housekeeper Tony Micelli (played by Tony Danza) and had signed on for the much-anticipated spin-off — but a source exclusively tells OK! that her "defiant, rebellious persona in recent years" has left showrunners gun shy

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"Alyssa's a magnet for internet trolls, and if she wants to be a sitcom star the whole country can embrace, she has to learn to read the room," continues the source. "She's still the key to getting this project off the ground, and the hope is she can develop some awareness before the buyers back out." Or else, Who's the Boss? won't be back in a moment.

In August, Sony Pictures Television announced they would be working on the sequel. “I AM SO EXCITED!” she wrote on Twitter. “I’ve wanted to share this for so long and now I can! We feel the time is right to tell the story of where these amazing characters are today. Can’t wait to share their stories with you. So happy.”

“Very excited to bring Who’s The Boss back to television!” Danza added on Instagram.

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"It’s going to be a relationship between Tony and Samantha and her kids and her world," Milano told Yahoo! in September about the new series. "I am so excited! I’m so excited. I can’t wait."

The Charmed alum admitted the sitcom was a "really progressive show" when it premiered in the '80s.

"The premise alone, right?" she explained. "There is a single, divorced mom to a little boy who ran her own business, who had a promiscuous, cougar-type of mother in Mona and then hired a male housekeeper to come in and take care of her house, to clean and take care of her son and cook. And so that was really progressive for that time, so the most important thing to me is that we’re equally as progressive but for these times."

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