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Christmas Behind Bars! Lori Loughlin Is 'Beyond Worried' About Spending The Holidays In Prison

Lori Loughlin
Source: MEGA

Dreaming of an orange Christmas?

Lori Loughlin is said to be “beyond worried” about spending the holidays behind bars, a source told In Touch after she was sentenced to two months in prison on August 21 following her involvement with the 2019 college admissions scandal.

U.S. District Judge Nathaniel Gorton previously ordered the Full House alum to turn herself into authorities by November 19 during the sentencing hearing. Loughlin‘s fashion designer husband, Mossimo Giannulli who will serve five months, must also surrender to the United States Bureau of Prisons before 2 p.m. on the same day.

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“She‘s already a complete wreck and the thought of being locked up during Thanksgiving and Christmas is really messing with her head,” the insider says. “It‘s a nightmare.”

Per their plea agreement, the actress also agreed to pay a $150,000 fine and perform 100 hours of community service and two years of supervised release, while her husband agreed to pay a $250,000 fine with 250 hours of community service and two years of supervised release. 

The actress, 56, and her husband, 57, originally pleaded not guilty when the scandal made headlines. But in May 2020, they changed their minds. Loughlin pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit wire and mail fraud, and Giannulli pleaded guilty to conspiracy to commit wire and mail fraud and honest services wire and mail fraud. 

In March 2019, the pair was arrested after they allegedly paid William Rick Singer — who was behind the whole scam — $500,000 for their daughters, Isabella Giannulli and Olivia Jade Giannulli, to attend the University of Southern California as members of the crew team — even though the girls had never been involved with the sport. 

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“The crime Giannulli and Loughlin committed was serious,” Assistant U.S. Attorney Justin O’Connell wrote in a memo on August 17. “Over the course of two years, they engaged twice in Singer’s fraudulent scheme. They involved both their daughters in the fraud, directing them to pose in staged photographs for use in fake athletic profiles and instructing one daughter how to conceal the scheme from her high school counselor.”

As Loughlin prepares for prison, she admits the “hardest part” will be not being able to see her two daughters for two months. Due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, there will be limited visitors allowed to see loved ones who are serving time. 

“Loughlin knows it’s not a long sentence,” an insider told In Touch. “Loughlin and Giannulli did think they would be able to spread out their prison time so one parent could be home with the kids, but that didn’t happen.” 

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